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Author Topic: • Basketball Bibliography: Our Unique Game of Basketball History, Biographies and Facts  (Read 160234 times)
HBC Brian Denver
eBA Stats Team
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« Reply #9 on: Oct 17, 2012, 11:20:01 PM »

Basketball Bibliography: Our Unique Game of Basketball History, Biographies and Facts

           
...a New Week ...a New Basketball eBook eBADVICE !            
                 

A Father First:
How My Life Became Bigger Than Basketball
by Dwyane Wade


Wade wrote his book after being awarded custody of his two boys in March 2011.

He ultimately wanted it to showcase the regular life of the eight-time NBA all-star.

Part of the amazing reaction he received for the book was from other fathers who congratulated him for putting his children first during his high-profile divorce.
"Obviously anyone who's a father, it's one of the most special things in life, and one of the most purest relationships and purest things that you have in life.
You know, I enjoy being one of the guys with my boys, but I also enjoy being a leader and being able to lead them and help mold the way that they think, and hopefully some of the things that they're going to do."
Dwyane Wade



Fatherhood, to me, isn’t something you do for awards or acclaim.
It’s a privilege and a huge responsibility


Excerpt from 'A Father First: How My Life Became Bigger
Than Basketball by Dwyane Wade'


"... And that was when I realized something else that paved the way for this book. First, it occurred to me that there was no guidebook out there that defined and detailed what being a great fulltime single dad really was. Where was the game plan for getting this right? Well, if there wasn’t one, then I would need to draw from the past and do the legwork to create one of my own.

Fatherhood, to me, isn’t something you do for awards or acclaim. It’s a privilege and a huge responsibility. Of course, the recognition I’ve been given has been flattering—except I don’t think it makes sense to honor me for what I should be doing in the first place. That said, I do hope that by opening up in ways I haven’t in the past, I can encourage other fathers or father figures to get more involved with their kids’ lives.

Another reason I’m writing this book is for Zaire and Zion. My hope is that in retracing some of my steps in life, both successful and not, I can pass on important lessons taught to me by others and that I had to pick up on my own. But I also want them to know there are no shortcuts or easy answers to being a father first, my life’s mission. I want them to know I’m learning still, sometimes on the fly.

Who really tells you how to be a dad? No one. Which is why I want to share my discoveries about how every child is different and you therefore have to parent each differently. I want to address the priorities I’m a stickler for—my beliefs about respect, responsibility, hard work, having dreams, and always being open to learning. Just as important, I want my boys, including my nephew Dahveon, to know they are my best teachers when it comes to being a good father. ..."



... Buy SAFELY   A Father First: How My Life Became Bigger Than Basketball by Dwyane Wade  DIRECTLY from ...

A Father First: How My Life Became Bigger Than Basketball by Dwyane Wade

  Get 10 % Refund on Your Order ! Here's HOW !




Your life is bigger than basketball...


"... For those men who are dads but not fully engaged as fathers, I want to urge you not to miss out on the greatest rewards and blessings that your children represent in your life. A lot of guys have approached me and asked how to become more involved when circumstances have kept you out of your kids’ lives. Hopefully you’ll find useful suggestions in my story. Aside from an abundance of reading materials, many communities provide all kinds of classes that promote the values of coparenting, which I can’t stress enough.

My sincere hope is to inspire both fathers and mothers who may feel challenged by single parenthood or by your current situation. I’m really writing for all parents, including those foster parents or relatives who raise kids that may not be biologically their own, as well as coaches, teachers, advocates, and mentors. By investing our love and energy and time in young people and in their development, we change and heal our world.

And, finally, I wanted to write this book for the kid in every single person out there so you can know the power of love and your own possibilities. If my story and the stories of my loved ones have taught me anything, it’s the simple truth that you have to play your heart out until the buzzer sounds no matter how disastrous the score may seem at times, because giving up is not an option.

I can’t promise that will always win you an NBA championship. But as my mother used to say when encouraging me to strive to do great things, to lift others as well as myself, “Your life is bigger than basketball.”

And that saying brings me back to Friday night, waiting for my boys to arrive. I had to gather my thoughts and feelings so I could give my sons the news that inspired this book in the first place. After all the uncertainty, I could assure them that after everything, they were now home.

And, finally, so was I.  ..."

By Dwyane Wade

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Marquette Alumnus Dwyane Wade Talks About His New Book
      'A Father First: How My Life Became Bigger Than Basketball'



Synopsis

Dwyane Wade, the eight-time All-Star for the Miami Heat, has miraculously defied the odds throughout his career and his life. In 2006, in just his third season in the NBA, Dwyane was named the Finals' MVP, after leading the Miami Heat to the Championship title, basketball's ultimate prize. Two years later, after possible career-ending injuries, he again rose from the ashes of doubt to help win a gold medal for the United States at the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

As co-captain, he helped lead the Heat to triumph in the 2012 NBA Championship. Little wonder that legendary coach Pat Riley has called Dwyane "B.I.W."—Best In the World.

As incredible as those achievements have been, it's off the court where Dwyane has sought his most cherished goal: being a good dad to his sons, Zaire and Zion, by playing a meaningful role in their lives. Recounting his fatherhood journey, Dwyane begins his story in March 2011 with the news that after a long, bitter custody battle, he has been awarded sole custody of his sons in a virtually unprecedented court decision.

A Father First chronicles the lessons Dwyane has learned as a single dad from the moment of the judge's ruling that instantly changed his life and the lives of his boys, and then back to the events in the past that shaped his dreams, prayers, and promises.

As the son of divorced parents determined to get along so that he and his sister Tragil could have loving relationships with both of them, Dwyane's early years were spent on Chicago's South Side. With poverty, violence, and drugs consuming the streets and their mom descending into addiction, Tragil made the heroic decision to take her younger brother to live with their father. After moving his household to suburban Robbins, Illinois, Dwyane Wade Sr. became Dwyane's first basketball coach.

While this period laid the groundwork for Dwyane's later mission for fathers to take greater responsibility for their kids, he was also inspired by his mother's miraculous victory over addiction and her gift for healing others. Both his mother and his father showed him that the unconditional love between parents and children is a powerful guiding force.

In A Father First, we meet the coaches, mentors, and teammates who played pivotal roles in Dwyane's stunning basketball career—from his early days shooting hoops on the neighborhood courts in Chicago, to his rising stardom at Marquette University in Milwaukee, to his emergence as an unheralded draft pick by the Miami Heat.

This book is a revealing, personal story of one of America's top athletes, but it is also a call to action—from a man who had to fight to be in his children's lives—that will show mothers and fathers how to step up and be parents themselves.

     



Praises for:
A Father First: How My Life Became Bigger Than Basketball
by Dwyane Wade


"... Wade isn’t just a dad, Dwyane’s mom added. He’s their Daddy, the guy who consoles them when they’re “crying and all snotted up.” And while Wade is famously low-key, his demeanor turns fiercely protective the instant he feels like his kids have been wronged.

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/06/17/2853423_p2/dfor-dad-wade-writes-book-on-fatherhood.html#storylink=cpy ..."
Adam H. Beasley & Kristofer Rios ~ The Miami Herald

"... "A Father First: How My Life Became Bigger Than Basketball" is also a part of Wade’s continuous advocacy for the Fatherhood & Mentoring Initiative, a national parenting program that encourages fathers to become more involved in their children’s lives.  ..."
Alexandria Fisher ~ NBC  Chicago

"... A Father First chronicles the lessons Dwyane has learned as a single dad from the moment of the judge’s ruling that instantly changed his life and the lives of his boys, and then back to the events in the past that shaped his dreams, prayers, and promises, Read more at http://bossip.com/632703/a-lil-positivity-dwyane-wade-preps-to-release-his-first-book-a-father-first-how-my-life-became-bigger-than-basketball-in-september-43081/#h7MbFGC7qc6ieR1f.99 ..."
Bossip Staff


Dwyane Wade about
'A Father First: How My Life Became Bigger Than Basketball'


"... "It speaks on fatherhood, speaks on the challenges. It also speaks on my childhood, kind of what I dealt with growing up, as well
I wanted to show some of my personal experiences with people who have dealt with some of the same things I've dealt with in life, or people that might one day deal with the same sort of things.

Fatherhood is a culture thing, and it's something that everyone can share in. I thought I would share my experiences and hopefully help others.

Obviously anyone who's a father, it's one of the most special things in life, and one of the most purest relationships and purest things that you have in life

You know, I enjoy being one of the guys with my boys, but I also enjoy being a leader and being able to lead them and help mold the way that they think, and hopefully some of the things that they're going to do". Wade says.


About the Author: Dwyane Wade

DWYANE WADE is a guard for the Miami Heat whose Wade's World Foundation has contributed millions of dollars to benefit children and families across America.
President Obama recently appointed him to help lead a program geared toward encouraging fathers to become more involved in their children's lives. He lives in Miami, Florida.


     



                        Click here to check ALL the BOOKS & eBOOKS by ( or about )
           Dwyane Wade


  UPDATED to



• Author: Dwyane Wade
• Format:  eBook & book
• Book Edition Number of Pages: 352 pages ~ 231 x 157 x 33 mm
• File Size: 1729 KB
• Browse Duration in Minutes: 60
• Wireless Delivery: Included within a minute of placing your order
• Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
• Lending: Enabled
• X-Ray: Not Enabled
• Book Publisher: William Morrow
• Book Publishing Date: September 4, 2012
• eBook Publisher: William Morrow
• eBook Publishing Date: September 4, 2012
• Book Edition Binding: Hardcover
• Book Edition Shipping Weight: 589 grams
• Language: English

• Also available: In the   NEW eBook Format

... more  A Father First: How My Life Became Bigger Than Basketball by Dwyane Wade  info at ...

A Father First: How My Life Became Bigger Than Basketball by Dwyane Wade



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Innovación en el Deporte
Por Roberto Silva Piñeiro









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HBC Brian Denver
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« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2012, 05:13:33 AM »

Basketball Bibliography: Our Unique Game of Basketball History, Biographies and Facts

...a New Week ...a New Basketball eBook eBA DVICE !
Fatherhood: Rising to the Ultimate Challenge By Nick Chiles and Etan Thomas
Fatherhood:
Rising to the Ultimate Challenge
By Nick Chiles and Etan Thomas


NBA player, poet, children's advocate, and devoted dad Thomas speaks about the importance of children.

He brings together revered professional athletes and coaches, actors and artists, politicians and faith leaders to weigh in on the importance of being a father in our nation.
This new book by NBA veteran Etan Thomas and Nick Chiles, isn't just about the beauty of being a dad. The writers also attack head-on fatherless in our community. Check out this  heartbreaking story from Derrick Coleman, who, in his 40, still longs to meet his father and vows never to be the deadbeat, invisible father his dad was in his life.

"... It’s just like that old saying, the man with no shoes didn’t know how good he had it until he saw the man with no feet. I want readers to come away from this book believing that you can be whatever you want to be even if you come from a situation that isn’t favorable. If you don’t have a father in your home or things are tough, you can still choose to make the right decisions that are beneficial to your entire life. Break the cycle. These are men who have done just that. President Obama came from a single-parent household. He didn’t know his father. And now he is the President of the United States. If he can do that, anything is possible. You don’t have to be a statistic. ..." Etan Thomas



Welcome to “Fatherhood”


"... Ah, Fatherhood week is finally here! Tomorrow is the official publication date of my next book, Fatherhood: Rising to the Ultimate Challenge, which I wrote with NBA veteran Etan Thomas. This is a week I’ve been awaiting for more than a year, ever since I got a fateful phone call telling me that Etan Thomas was looking for a writer to help him put together a book that could serve as one of our generation’s definitive statements about fatherhood.

Let me stop tripping. The early hopes for the book weren’t quite so lofty. We were hoping to come up with something that was readable and timely—something that both of us would be proud of, that we would be honored to have our names adorn its cover. But then the men started signing on.

Prominent, successful, introspective men who were eager to be a part of our mission to define and describe fatherhood, to reveal its pain and promise. Men like Ice Cube and Michael Moore, Taye Diggs and Andre Agassi, Chris Paul and Isaiah Washington, Baron Davis and Grant Hill, Kevin Durant and Stuart Scott. Some of the most celebrated men in our society; men with powerful views on the exciting rollercoaster ride that is fatherhood. ..."


... Buy SAFELY   Fatherhood: Rising to the Ultimate Challenge By Nick Chiles and Etan Thomas  DIRECTLY from ...

Fatherhood: Rising to the Ultimate Challenge By Nick Chiles and Etan Thomas

  Get 10 % Refund on Your Order ! Here's HOW !




We Had Far Exceeded our Early Hopes


"...  Once we were done, both Etan and I realized that we had far exceeded our early hopes. We had come up with a book that could serve as a guide for fathers new and fathers old, future fathers and current fathers who are struggling to slough off the effects of their own fatherless childhoods and to be there for their own children so that they aren’t forced to endure the same ordeal. As Etan said in the pages of Fatherhood, what we produced was the book that Etan wishes he had when he was a boy grappling with intense anger and confusion because his father wasn’t there in his house everyday.

There is no more appropriate place to herald the publication of Fatherhood than MyBrownBaby, a site that my wife Denene created specifically to explore and celebrate the joy and anguish of parenting children of color. For four years, MyBrownBaby has been delving into many of the issues we address in Fatherhood, making this a match made in publishing heaven.

For the entire week, we will be sharing excerpts from the book, an exclusive interview with Etan Thomas, and picking out some of the most explosive essays in the book by our celebrated contributors. And, of course, we would be honored if you chose to go out and pick up a copy of the book—or just click here and have it immediately delivered to your house.  ..."

Nick Chiles


     




Etan Thomas about Fatherhood


During his 10-year NBA career, Etan Thomas developed a reputation as a sensitive, socially conscious, deep-thinking athlete. In fact, the title for his first book, a poetry volume, was “More Than An Athlete.” Having grown up in a “broken home”—an expression Etan has always hated—he became acutely aware of the ways in which an absent father can effect the development of a young boy. Though he did see his father every few weeks during most of his childhood in Tulsa, Etan still fought a palpable, destructive anger that got especially bad during his junior high and high school years. He used writing as a way of dealing with the anger and the pain of his father not being around more. Now, two decades later, Etan has teamed up with Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Nick Chiles to create a book, Fatherhood: Rising to the Ultimate Challenge, that he says would have been enormously helpful to him when he was a boy. It includes thought-provoking essays about fatherhood from celebrities ranging from Taye Diggs and Malcolm Jamal-Warner to Yao Ming and Grant Hill.

"... The reaction to the book has surprised me the most was when I went on The Tom Joyner Morning show recently—I’ve been listening to his show for a long time now—and his reaction was interesting. He was very complimentary, very positive about everything; he appreciated me doing it. I thought that was a great compliment because he’s a big voice in our community. I was humbled by and thankful for that type of reception.

I want people to take away from reading my book a lot, because each chapter is completely different. One chapter they’ll read and hear heartwarming stories like Taye Diggs’, about how happy he was with the birth of his son Walker. When he’s talking about it, you can almost see his patented smile. In another chapter, we’re talking about encouraging young people who grew up without fathers, that they can be anything they want to be in life, the sky is the limit for them.

You hear Ice Cube talking to young people, encouraging them, telling them they don’t need to go down a certain path and wind up in prison. He’s painting a picture of what prison is, the horrors of prison. In that, you can see that patented Ice Cube scowl on his face. We’re encouraging young men to step up as fathers by showing them the joy and beauty and satisfaction you get from being a father. You hear Andre Agassi talking about that in his essay.

About the process of writing the book, I was surprised most about the number of people who agreed to be in it. At first when I started out, my outlook was a lot smaller, my scope of what I thought it would be was a lot smaller. Then I thought, I’ve met a lot of people, I can start asking and all they can say is ‘No.’ I asked Kareem, I asked Cornel West, I asked Tony Hawk. It kept going from there. Everybody was really receptive to it.

They were surprised to see the depth so many men brought to the topic when they started talking about it. I wouldn’t have even asked them to write about some of the things they went into in their essays. Like Al Sharpton and Stuart Scott, two really personal situations that out of respect I wouldn’t have asked them that. But they wanted to talk about it. It was part of their maturation process; the whole part of fatherhood they wanted to share. They opened up in ways you don’t really hear men open up like that. It was great.

I don’t know why fatherhood hasn’t been explored more... I think a lot of time men are reluctant to talk about this. Even myself I didn’t plan on getting this deep into my personal feelings. It sounds kind of funny because I’m writing the book, but men don’t really talk about it with this depth; it’s just not something men typically do.

This issue so important for the African-American community and for every community, but I work with a lot of young people, especially in correctional facilities. I go there and see all young people who look like me. I want to encourage them, even if they come from a situation that might not be favorable, they can still make the right choices in life. Even if they don’t want to take my word for it, here they can listen to Ice Cube say it, they can listen to Styles P say it, or they can listen to Kevin Durant talk about how he grew up in a single parent household, or Baron Davis, who grew up in probably a way worse situation than any of them grew up in, but he was able to make it. I want them to have these examples when they hear those negative statistics thrown at them. Or they’re from this neighborhood or from this broken home and the statistics say they probably aren’t going to make it, I want them to say, ‘No, I just read Baron Davis made it, I read Ice Cube tell me how I can make it, I read the ultimate story of Barack Obama who met his father once or twice and he ended up being president of the United States.’ I want them to see that if they can make it, I think I can make it too.

It is so important to have a father around because if there are no positive male influences in a young man’s life, then who are they going to look up to? I understand that when they go toward the gang life it is because the gang is like a brotherhood. The OGs are like your father figures. But that’s the negative. I want to show what can happen if you choose a positive father figure.

Somebody will say to me, “It’s easy for you to talk about being a good father when you are in the NBA and make a lot of money”? ...but !
Professional athletes certainly face different challenges when it comes to fatherhood. Sure, we have more means, but we are on the road all the time. When you are young and you are going to different cities all the time and hanging out, it’s cool. But then when you get older and you have kids and those kids can verbalize that they don’t want you to go, and they miss you, and they cry, it changes everything. Being physically gone so much is very tough on us.

Etan Thomas

Please, Refresh the Page if You Can't watch the Preview and the Videos !



Etan Thomas, author of "Fatherhood: Rising to the Ultimate Challenge".
 shares his perspective on raising kids.



Synopsis

Thomas, a star in the NBA as a center for the Atlanta Hawks as well as a participant in President Obama’s Fatherhood Initiative, states upfront that he’s “not a fatherhood expert.” But having collected essays offering insights and experiences about fatherhood from a fascinating and diverse range of individuals—including Bill Cosby, John King, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Andre Agassi, and others—Thomas has produced an insightful book that provides “a manual for fathers new and old.”

Many of the pieces address the experience of fatherless kids in African-American communities. But from rapper Ice Cube to filmmaker Michael Moore, the book’s message is one of hope. As Moore states, “One of the ‘Big Lies’ that we are told in our society is that there’s something wrong with you if you come from a ‘broken home’ or a home with a single mother.”

Thomas also offers a moving tribute to the many single mothers “who are forced to take on the role of the father in the household.” While Thomas’s “Tao of fatherhood” is a wonderful distillation of all the book’s insights—“Be there”— his book also contains a plethora of memorable and eloquent advice for all fathers, such as that from Dr. Cornel West: “To be a great father, you must be a militant for tenderness, an extremist for love, a fanatic for fairness, and, in the larger society, a drum major for justice.”


Would You Want to Browse and Look Inside
'Fatherhood: Rising to the Ultimate Challenge'
in an Amazon Books 'Limited Preview' ?



Praises for:
'Fatherhood: Rising to the Ultimate Challenge' By Nick Chiles and Etan Thomas

"...  “Be there. Those seven letters encompass the tao of fatherhood.” —Etan Thomas
In Fatherhood, beloved NBA player, poet, youth advocate, and devoted dad Etan Thomas speaks from his heart on what matters most in his life—being there for his children. As a highly respected player with the NBA and a leading participant in President Obama’s Fatherhood Initiative, Etan has reached out to young men (often young fathers) in the juvenile detention system and in local communities. He knows firsthand the difference having a father in your life every day can make—and as a father of three, Etan walks the talk in his own life.

Now, he brings together a chorus of voices—highly revered professional athletes and coaches, actors and performing artists, politicians and leaders of faith—to weigh in on the importance of being a father in our nation today. Isaiah Washington, Howard Dean, Kareem Abdul Jabbar, Taye Diggs, Malcolm Jamal Warner, Tony Hawk, Al Sharpton, Chuck D and many more share what they’ve learned from being a father, having a father, or in some cases not having a father around.

Through these inspiring personal experiences, Etan and the men he’s gathered together hope to share the message that by standing up and taking an active role as fathers, men not only find their own lives more joyful and fulfilling, they pass on to the next generation an unshakable legacy of love, wisdom, responsibility, and strength. ..."
Booklist Reviews


Table of Contents

Got to be there : spending time with your children
Happy feelings : finding joy with your children
Stronger than pride : showing love to your children
You've got a friend : using elders to deliver honesty and wisdom to your children
The roots of a tree : reaching back into history to lift up your children
Sky is the limit : helping children overcome fatherlessness
Don't believe the hype : fighting the stereotypes that can overwhelm your children
Redemption song : overcoming anger : you have to let it go
Dear mama : helping mothers shoulder the burden
Wake up, everybody : examining Bill Cosby's plea for responsible fathers
Poem by Etan Thomas
Conclusion by Dr. Cornel West.


About the Authors: Nick Chiles


Nick Chiles is a reporter for the Star-Ledger in Newark.

Cornel West is Class of 1943 University Professor in the Center for African American Studies at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey. He is considered one of America's most provocative public individuals and has been a champion for racial justice since childhood. His writing, speaking, and teaching weave together the traditions of the black Baptist church, progressive politics, and jazz. The "New York Times" has praised his "ferocious moral vision.

Tony Dungy and his wife Lauren Dungy are active members of a number of family, faith, and community-based organizations including All Pro Dad, iMom, Fellowship of Chrstian Athletes, Mentors for Life, Family First, Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, and the Boys and Girls Club of America. Tony is a former NFL player and retired head coach of the 2006 Superbowl Champions, the Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League.


Etan Thomas


Dedreck Etan Thomas, commonly referred to as Etan Thomas (born April 1, 1978 in Harlem, New York), is an American professional basketball player who last played for the Atlanta Hawks of the National Basketball Association.

Etan Thomas played college basketball at Syracuse University from 1996–2000, where he averaged 11 points per game and almost 7 rebounds per game and graduated with a degree in business management. His senior year he was named Big East Defensive Player of the Year. At the end of his Syracuse career, Thomas was drafted 12th overall in the 2000 NBA Draft by the Dallas Mavericks. He also played basketball at Booker T. Washington High School in Tulsa, OK, where he was a teammate of De'mond Parker, R.W. McQuarters and Ryan Humphrey.

Without ever playing a game for the Mavericks, he was traded to the Washington Wizards in 2001 and has averaged 6.7 points and 5.3 rebounds throughout his career.
On June 23, 2009, he was traded along with Oleksiy Pecherov, Darius Songaila, and a first-round draft pick to the Minnesota Timberwolves for Randy Foye and Mike Miller.
On July 27, 2009, he was traded to the Oklahoma City Thunder along with a 2010 second-round draft pick and a conditional 2010 second-round draft pick in exchange for guards Chucky Atkins and Damien Wilkins.
On September 2, 2010, it was announced that the Atlanta Hawks had signed Thomas.

His name is derived from King Akhenaten, an African king.
In 2005, Thomas released a book of poetry titled " More Than an Athlete: Poems by Etan Thomas" which included works critical of former Wizards head coach Doug Collins.
He is a peace activist; in September 2005, Thomas was one of several celebrities to speak at the anti-war rally in Washington D.C.. He also spoke out at the September 15, 2007 anti-war protest in Washington D.C. He regularly blogs on the Huffington Post.
Thomas actively supported President Barack Obama's 2008 campaign. On August 16, 2008, he appeared with Democratic National Committee chair Howard Dean at stops in northern Virginia as part of the Democratic National Committee's "Register for Change" bus tour to encourage local voter registration drives. Thomas gave speeches at two stops in Fairfax County (Lee District: Etan Thomas speech) and the City of Alexandria. In January 2010, Thomas donated $30,000 to the Haiti relief efforts after the 2010 Haiti earthquake.


Click here to check ALL the BOOKS & eBOOKS by ( or about )
Nick Chiles


Click here to check ALL the BOOKS & eBOOKS by ( or about )
Etan Thomas


UPDATED to



• Author: Nick Chiles y Etan Thomas
• Formats:  eBook & Book
• Reading level:  Ages 18 and up
• Book Edition Number of Pages: 320 ~  9.1 x 6.1 x 1.3 inches
• File Size:  460 KB
• Browse Duration in Minutes: 60
• Wireless Delivery: Included within a minute of placing your order
• Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
• Lending: Enabled
• Text-to-Speech: Enabled
• Publisher: NAL ~ First edition
• Publishing Date: NEW ON May 1st, 2012
• eBook Edition: NEW ON May 1st, 2012
• Book Edition Binding: Hardcover
• Book Edition Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
• Language: English

• Also available: In the classic hardcover edition


... more  Fatherhood: Rising to the Ultimate Challenge By Nick Chiles and Etan Thomas   info at ...

Fatherhood: Rising to the Ultimate Challenge By Nick Chiles and Etan Thomas



To see the Basketball Book eBA DVICE in Spanish:

Una Nueva Semana... Un Nuevo Libro Recomendado por eBA ...
El Deporte: una estrategia de Convivencia y Promoción de la Salud: Los programas deportivos, una experiencia de valores por
Didier Fernando Gaviria Cortes, Victor H. Arboleda S. y Berena P. Torres M.
El Deporte: una estrategia de Convivencia y Promoción de la Salud:
Los programas deportivos,
una experiencia de valores
por Didier Fernando Gaviria Cortes,
Victor H. Arboleda S.
y Berena P. Torres M.






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BGA John Volger
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« Reply #7 on: Apr 24, 2012, 09:00:04 PM »

Basketball Bibliography: Our Unique Game of Basketball History, Biographies and Facts

...a New Week ...a New Basketball eBook eBA DVICE !

Black Men Can't Shoot
By Scott N. Brooks


Black Men Can’t Shoot provides an ethnographic account of the lives of two young black men—Ray and Jermaine—as they work to become “known” as great ball players, and the implications of their doing so for their life chances.

The book is based on field research Professor Brooks conducted in Philadelphia, as a coach, mentor and friend, over a four-year period.
It is a clearly written, accessible and compelling sociological story about social networks, opportunity structures, and the setbacks and successes that characterize adolescence, perhaps especially urban adolescence. BMCS is a very good book.


The Role of Old Heads


An excerpt from 'Black Men Can’t Shoot' by Scott N. Brooks

Relationships formed on the playground often are distinctive and remarkable, most notably, relationships between older and younger men, “old heads” and “young bulls.” Old heads are important as supporters, role models, and/or coaches because they teach, encourage, praise, and provide support for younger players. Jermaine described old heads in this way: “It’s like, it’s like certain people like respect [an old head] … it’s a respect thing. You call them an old head, it’s like, nah’imean [you know what I mean] … you admire their game. Or you call them old head, they older than you, nah’imean.” There are some instances where old heads perform different functions, as Jermaine explained in his relationships:

You got different ones, it depends, like, my old head, I still got the same one, but some of them come and go. Like, most of them, they get locked up or something, they stop playing basketball or whatever or they really don’t care … they just there 'cause they think you gonna go to the League (NBA) or something like that. That’s how most of them is.

But the whole thing about me is, where I’m from, I’m more like the underrated player. So I really don’t have a lot of old heads like everybody else do. I only have like two old heads, and they really just play [with me] and they push me. But everybody else, I mean, they got like thousands and they get money [from them]. If they need something, they just buy something, they there for them. And I don’t really got that [an old head relationship like this] and that’s what pushed me real hard 'cause I’m trying to get where they at, like if I need sneaks or something, I call somebody and they give it to me, and I can’t really do that right now. They mostly come and go, but there’s different types of old heads.

You got a old head like you respect him, whatever, or the old head you just say it 'cause he older than you and show him respect, but you got a couple of old heads, they just there for you, no matter [what], whenever you need something, you in trouble, you need a ride to a game, they there for you. So there’s different types. You use it [the term “old head”] in different meanings.

Old heads often become friends with younger men who show promise, “taking [them] on.” “Taking a kid on” suggests that an old head is tied to a young bull and has a close relationship offering emotional, financial, or other types of support or resources when necessary. They come in different forms. Coaches, mentors, and instructors can be old heads, and their personal success and experience in basketball increases the amount of technical assistance they can give. But drug dealers can be old heads too, attracted by being associated with a local celebrity who might later “make it.”

They can mentor through warning and turn younger men away from the street because of the potential to do something great and legitimate, or they can exploit players through gambling. They stage one-on-one games between players or bet on games, choosing their young bull or his team to win. Money is often central to this relationship, as drug dealers can support and subsidize a young ball player. Repayment may be necessary and made explicit. After purchasing several pairs of basketball shoes for Ray, one old head asked him to sign a handwritten contract to be repaid $10,000 if he made it to the NBA.


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A Saturday Moring At Espy


An excerpt from 'Black Men Can’t Shoot' by Scott N. Brooks

Jermaine and Ray’s relationship developed because they were neighbors close in age, but intensified with their shared basketball experiences and dedication to becoming known basketball players. They went to their local playground, Espy, daily to practice shooting, play games, and check in with others. Playing in their neighborhood, on courts they considered their home courts, was where they felt safest and could play with familiarity. Jermaine and Ray knew who would be there, the rules of the court, when the regulars played, and their status position among friends. They played on the same team whenever possible, feeling that their friendship and knowledge of each other was a definite advantage. They pushed each other to improve and to earn local reputations as players.

One spring Saturday morning, I watched Jermaine and Ray play at Espy playground. They were warming up with others, trying their best to take turns shooting. It was important to make shots because players return the ball to a shooter after a made shot, but misses are rebounded and shot by whoever gets the rebound. Jermaine practiced jump shots and “finger roll” layups. He looked to see if it was clear for him to shoot, to avoid his ball hitting another ball being shot at the same time. Jermaine would dribble hard to the basket, lunge, and then jump up toward the basket, one leg leading, while cradling the ball in his right arm.

As he rose in the air and neared the rim, he lifted the ball up in one fell swoop until it was just above the rim. Jermaine rolled the ball down his hand, and with a light flip of his wrist, the ball hopped from his fingertips and through the rim. These moves were rehearsals for his eventual performance. Jermaine was considered a jumper, and it was important for him to test his legs and show his jumping ability, that he had “ups” or “bunnies,” just as Ray practiced jump shots because he was known as a shooter. These shows could intimidate opposing players and encourage teammates.

Someone yelled, “Let’s go,” and the players moved into their positions. Those who were about to play in the first game took their last practice shots and went through their stretching and warm-up rituals: running in place, jumping up and down, touching their toes, and standing on one leg, while grabbing and pulling their other leg behind them. Those who were not playing sat down or moved to a side court.

Ray and Jermaine were playing with Marcus, Jackson, and one other man. Ray had missed on “shooting for firsts [or outs]”—the shot that is taken to determine which team gets the first offensive possession—so the other team started with the ball. Marcus directed Ray and Jermaine on defense by pointing to spots on the court where they should be. Marcus had two goals—to win and for the boys to learn something they would need for high school basketball.

At Espy the regulars play a two-three zone defense, which means that the defenders guard a specific area of the court. Two players are set about ten feet in front of the basket they are defending, and their other three teammates are in positions three feet in front of the basket. Both sets of defenders form horizontal lines parallel to the basket. Playing zone defense is not typical playground basketball. On most other playgrounds in the city, man-to-man defense is the rule. In man-to-man defense, each player guards a particular individual on the opposing team, one that they choose or are instructed to guard. This prevents confusion, because each player is only responsible for defending one competitor.

A zone defense, however, requires awareness, coordination, trust, and players who share an understanding of what their teammates are going to do in certain situations. Zone defenses are territorial, and individuals are expected to cover a range that is constantly in flux. Marcus’s special directions to Jermaine and Ray illustrate this: “Jermaine, you got down low, the center. Don’t let them pass the ball in the middle. [Then looking to Ray] Ray, you play up top with me. If a man has the ball, you got to guard him until he give it up [passes the ball], then you rotate back, all right?”

Ray was supposed to move with the player as long as they had the ball, Marcus said, and then he was to move back to his spot when the player gave up the ball. While Ray guarded the player that was out of his spot, Marcus would be covering Ray’s spot, and when Ray moved back, Marcus would return to his own spot. They had to trust each other to move to the right place at the right time, and they had to be aware of any movement by opposing players.

Jermaine was told to be in the center of the court close to the basket, and to make sure that players on the opposing team did not get the ball in the middle of the zone. Marcus’s directions aligned the team’s efforts. If each person was clear on his role, there would be no confusion among teammates or breakdowns in communication that would allow the other team to get an open shot or easy basket.

Jermaine was tested as soon as the game began. An opposing player darted to the center of the zone defense, and Jermaine moved to prevent the pass into the player. He was too late and the player caught the ball. Jermaine crowded the player with his arms outstretched to deter him from trying to shoot or drive to the basket. Jermaine’s actions worked; the player passed the ball.

Marcus coached Jermaine and Ray on offense, as well. When Jermaine grabbed a rebound after the opposing team missed a shot, Marcus yelled, “Look up!” Jermaine looked up the court and threw the ball to Ray, who out-sprinted the opposing team down to the other basket and scored.

On this particular Saturday, their team won four games in a row, before losing one. They played well and Marcus had guided Ray and Jermaine throughout, telling them where they should be, what they should do, and encouraging them (mostly Ray) to shoot and be tougher.

Marcus and Jackson shot the most, and they scored most of the team’s points. Jackson was a gunner, meaning he shot a lot and rarely passed. He took shots while two people guarded him. He drove to the basket, where the other team had their three players in a zone, and tried to shoot over the bigger guys. Jackson also had breakdowns on defense. Instead of being in a good position to prevent easy scores, he reached after the ball a few times to jar it loose from an opposing player’s hands, often letting the opposing player drive for an easy basket when he was unable to steal the ball.

None of his teammates said anything, and no one seemed upset that he had played poor defense or had not passed the ball. Jackson was respected for his scoring ability, and therefore his teammates deferred to him, allowing him to shoot the ball whenever he pleased and to play poor defense with no backlash. The silence from other teammates when Jackson played poorly illustrated the team’s hierarchy, the roles of different individuals, and that they all understood the code of conduct.

On the other hand, Jackson criticized Jermaine for taking a difficult shot and missing it. The score was tied eleven to eleven—the game ends when one team scores twelve. Up to that point, Jermaine had not taken a lot of shots. He was set up near the basket and Ray passed him the ball. Jermaine received the pass with his back to the basket, quickly jumped, and shot the ball without seeing the basket, turning 180 degrees in the air as he shot. Unfortunately, his defender jumped at the same time and blocked the shot.

“What are you doing? I was open. Damn!” Jackson said as he trotted back on defense. Jermaine pouted and said, “That’s the only shot I took all game.” It was a costly shot. The other team scored the go-ahead basket and won. Jermaine’s shot was inappropriate, according to Jackson, and no one challenged Jackson’s view. Jermaine did not have the status to take a shot and miss when it could mean winning or losing the game.

By taking his shot at that moment, he defied convention and the hierarchy that the team had been following. Had Jermaine made the basket, Jackson most likely would not have criticized him. Instead, he may have given Jermaine “props” (praise or respect) for taking the shot at such an important time and making it. The last shot is an important shot, usually reserved for those of high status. The team had to sit down to wait for another opportunity to play, which usually was a long wait.

The team was organized according to how much each player’s scoring ability was recognized. Essentially, it was predetermined who should shoot. Jackson and Marcus had the “green light,” or freedom to shoot whenever they wanted, without suffering any repercussions or upsetting the others. Ray was allowed some freedom to shoot because he was known for his age and was considered a good shooter. Jermaine and the other teammate—five on five is played at Espy—were lowest on the totem pole. They knew that they were expected to assume supporting roles. One had to have a preexisting status (as a known player or thug) or had to work hard to gain the respect of others before being given the right to shoot freely.

Higher-status individuals are expected by others to monopolize the ball and get the most shots; therefore they are typically the leading scorers even when they shoot a low percentage. Moreover, they typically receive little blame, relative to their amount of responsibility. Importantly though, a person’s status is not simply a static label that, once achieved, requires no further effort. Rather, achieving and retaining status is a dynamic process. It demands constant attention because status differences between people inform expectations and interactions. This is not always settled—there are people with ambition, hoping to improve their status.




Synopsis

The myth of the natural black athlete is widespread, though it's usually only talked about when a sports commentator or celebrity embarrasses himself by bringing it up in public. Those gaffes are swiftly decried as racist, but apart from their link to the long history of ugly racial stereotypes about black people - especially men - they are also harmful because they obscure very real, hard-fought accomplishments.

As Black Men Can't Shoot demonstrates, such successes on the basketball court don't just happen because of natural gifts - instead, they grow out of the long, tough, and unpredictable process of becoming a known player. Scott N. Brooks spent four years coaching summer league basketball in Philadelphia. And what he saw, heard, and felt working with the young black men on his team tells us much about how some kids are able to make the extraordinary journey from the ghetto to the NCAA.

  To show how good players make the transition to greatness, Brooks tells the story of two young men, Jermaine and Ray, following them through their high school years and chronicling their breakthroughs and frustrations on the court as well as their troubles at home. We witness them negotiating the pitfalls of forging a career and a path out of poverty, we see their triumphs and setbacks, and we hear from the network of people - their families, the neighborhood elders, and Coach Brooks himself - invested in their fates.

Black Men Can't Shoot has all the hallmarks of a classic sports book, with a climactic championship game and a suspenseful ending as we wait to find out if Jermaine and Ray will be recruited. Brooks's moving coming-of-age story counters the belief that basketball only exploits kids and lures them into following empty dreams - and shows us that by playing ball, some of these young black men have already begun their education even before they get to college.


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Praises for:
'Black Men Can't Shoot' by Scott N. Brooks

"... Brooks (sociology, Univ. of California at Riverside), having studied under and been inspired by the highly esteemed Elijah Anderson at the University of Pennsylvania, provides an ethnographic description of recreational basketball in South Philadelphia. A self-professed frustrated former high school basketball player (he blames himself and his former coach for his shortcomings), the author looks at the hopes and dreams of young inner-city black men he coached who aspired to play ball professionally. In true sociological tradition, he presents detailed information on members of the famed Blade Rodgers Neighborhood Development League, based on interviews with these athletes, their families, coaches, and other locals.

While focusing on two athletes in particular, Brooks educates readers about a number of "street" realities (e.g., the daily struggle for survival and basketball viewed as a way out of the ghetto). Demystifying certain racial stereotypes, Brooks explains that even God-given skills must be developed through hard work and dedication. His book is a worthy ethnographic text and is recommended especially for students of sports sociology. ..."
Tim Delaney, SUNY at Oswego

"... Scott was an average high school basketball player, but Black Men Can’t Shoot is an all-star book. I couldn’t put it down. It cracked me up, put me on edge, and reminded me why I love this game—Chuck, Jermaine, and Ray, the old heads and the young bulls. It’s about the people. ...”
Jason Kidd, nine-time NBA All-Star

“... This is a smart and authentic book. It not only captures the feel of Philadelphia high school basketball; it provides acute and accurate insight into the minds of players. Although I’m on the other side, I learned something. Most importantly, it’s a moving story that stays with you. ...”
Fran Dunphy, Head Coach, Temple University

“... Brooks makes clear how contingent the fate of these young men is on the step-by-step negotiation of multiple career steps and how many ways there are to fail. But he also offers a bright note to counter the endless tales of misery from the ghetto by showing us how many second and third and fourth chances there are to recover what seemed to be lost. Black Men Can’t Shoot is compelling—you really want to know what will happen next, and I don’t think anyone who starts to read this book will put it down until they get to the end. ...”
Howard S. Becker, author of Outsiders

“... 'Black Men Can’t Shoot' is carefully observed, ethnographically rich, and conceptually sophisticated—an original work of importance that provides a powerful eye on the world of black ghetto youth today. A must read for anyone wishing to understand. ...”
Elijah Anderson, author of Streetwise

“... Brooks represents Philly well. It’s clear that he not only sat on the bench—he learned some things. His writing is right on the money. It took me back to my playing days and the relationships I’ve developed through basketball. From the gym to the playgrounds and uptown, Brooks lets you know what Philly ball is all about. ...”
Lionel Simmons, third all-time

“... In this vivid depiction of the urban reality of grassroots basketball, Scott Brooks exhibits an insider’s passion for the game, broad and deep knowledge of the local history and social context, and a real feel for the significance of basketball in Philly’s black community. Along with offering important ideas about the relationship between race and sports, Black Men Can’t Shoot is packed with genuine drama and intrigue making it one of those rare books that are both insightful and truly engaging. ...”
Douglas Hartmann, author of Race, Culture, and the Revolt of the Black Athlete: The 1968 Olympic Protests and Their Aftermath

“... [Brooks] looks at the hopes and dreams of young inner-city black men he coached who aspired to play ball professionally. In true sociological tradition, he presents detailed information on members of the famed Blade Rodgers Neighborhood Development League, based on interviews with these athletes, their families, coaches, and other locals. While focusing on two athletes in particular, Brooks educates readers about a number of ‘street’ realities (e.g., the daily struggle for survival and basketball viewed as a way out of the ghetto). Demystifying certain racial stereotypes, Brooks explains that even God-given skills must be developed through hard work and dedication. His book is a worthy ethnographic text. ...”
Library Journal
 
"... Readers are taken into the world of two young basketball players battling the constraints of urban poverty and the subsequent challenges associated with using basketball as a means to rise above these constraints. . . . Brooks was able to gain access to a world that few outsiders experience or understand. Rich, detailed descriptions of events and settings, along with significant quotes by the players, coaches, parents, and other influential individuals in the young men''s lives, lend credibility and validity to the ethnography''s findings. ...”
Choice

"... A very entertaining, in depth look at the high school basketball scene in the Philadelphia area. . . . Basketball allows these kids to dream--it allows them to consider that they might have a future other than hanging out on the street corner. Consider it documentation of the transformative effects of hoops. ..."
Jeff Fox Hoops Manifesto


Table of Contents:

Jermaine and Ray
Becoming a basketball player
Getting known through networks and exposure
Playing school ball
Old heads and young bulls
A Saturday morning at Espy
The heart of the playground
Chuck breaks them down
Gotta want it "like that"
Playing uptown
Some fall off
Bringing 'em back and putting it all together
The chip
The glow but reality of success
Ray vs. Green
Playing everywhere
Can't look poor
Implosion
Moving north
Learning other stuff
A star is born; another is still waiting
Politics and "pub(licity)"
Getting in (school) and getting out (of the hood)
Being used


About the Author: Scott N. Brooks

Black Men Can't Shoot by Scott N. Brooks
Scott N. Brooks is assistant professor of sociology at the University of California, Riverside.
With the NBA in the midst of a labor disagreement, players from the world’s premier basketball league are scattering in different directions to maintain their skills (and get paid). This past summer, a number of NBA players returned to their roots, so to speak, by playing in summer leagues in places like DC, LA, New York, and Baltimore. For many black players who grew up in big cities, summer leagues were the place where they first learned basketball, under the watchful eyes of older men who had also played the game—and made names for themselves—on the same courts.

Scott N. Brooks spent four years coaching youth basketball in one of these leagues in South Philadelphia, bringing the perspective of a sociologist to this institution of inner-city neighborhoods. The book based on his experiences and his research, Black Men Can’t Shoot (University of Chicago Press, 2009), follows two of the league’s young players, Jermaine and Ray, as they learn the game, develop their skills, and work to “get known” in the world of Philadelphia basketball. As Scott explains in the interview, “getting known” is a complicated and demanding process of gaining status on the court and in the community. Like athletes in other sports, young basketball players like Jermaine and Ray seek to get the attention of scouts and recruiters by participating in multiple leagues, traveling teams, and regional tournaments. But “getting known” in South Philly basketball is about much more than a coveted college scholarship. Being a known player brings social prestige at school and the protection and patronage of older men in the neighborhood, the chorus of elders known as “old heads.” Attaining this status, Scott explains, is not a matter of simple ability, the so-called natural athleticism of blacks.  Instead, it is the product of disciplined work, careful networking, and study of the game.

Scott’s book is not about the hoop dreams of Jermaine and Ray. Instead, it is about hoop reality—about basketball as part of the social fabric of an inner-city neighborhood and the ways that black men, young and old, use the game to improve their personal situations and better their communities.


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• Author: Scott N. Brooks
• Format:  eBook & Book
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• eBook Edition: NEW ON April 12, 2012
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• Book Edition Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds
• Language: English

• Also available: In the classic paperback edition


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« Reply #6 on: Apr 17, 2012, 10:23:07 PM »

Basketball Bibliography: Our Unique Game of Basketball History, Biographies and Facts

...a New Week ...a New Basketball eBook eBA DVICE !
The Butler Way: The Best of Butler Basketball by David Woods with Foreword by Clark Kellogg
The Butler Way: The Best of Butler Basketball
by David Woods
with Foreword by Clark Kellogg


The Butler Way is a term used since the 2006-07 men's NCAA college basketball season by broadcasters and sportswriters nationwide to describe the governing philosophy of the  Butler Bulldogs, one of the most successful mid-major programs. The Butler Way demands commitment, denies selfishness and accepts reality, yet seeks constant improvement while promoting the good of the team above self.
The Butler Way was originally forged by Butler University's legendary coach and administrator, Tony Hinkle.

Butler Bulldogs' Athletic Director Barry Collier is often credited with resurrecting the term and its underlying attitude during his time as the Butler University Men's Basketball coach from 1989 through 2000.



The Butler Way' Five Principles


Despite playing in a mid-major conference, Butler rose to national prominence in recent years. They ranked in most media polls for all but a few weeks from the 2006-07 season to the 2011-12 season, and competed in the post season every year since 1997, except for 2004 and 2005. In the 2010 NCAA Tournament, Butler was runner-up to Duke, advancing to the National Championship Game after defeating Michigan State in the Final Four.

With a total enrollment of only 4,500 students, Butler is the smallest school to play for a national championship since the tournament expanded to 64 teams in 1985.

The Bulldogs also went to the championship game in the following NCAA Tournament, falling to UConn after defeating VCU in the Final Four. With the victory over VCU, Butler became the first mid-major program to reach the championship game in successive seasons since 1979, when seeding of the tournament began, and the only team from the state of Indiana to reach back-to-back championship games.

The Butler Way has become closely associated with the five principles of Butler Basketball. The five principles as posted in the Men's Basketball locker-room are as follows:

Humility - know who we are, strengths and weaknesses
Passion - do not be lukewarm, commit to excellence
Unity - do not divide our house, team first
Servanthood - make teammates better, lead by giving
Thankfulness - learn from every circumstance


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Complete Ccommitment and Teamwork Above Self


Because of the school's history of basketball success, location in the heart of the land of "Hoosier Hysteria", and lack of a scholarship football program, the Butler University fan base is primarily basketball oriented. Other athletics enjoy substantial followings of current students and alumni, but only basketball has garnered interest from a national audience.

Two studies estimated that television, print, and online news coverage of Butler's 2010 and 2011 appearances in the NCAA tournament championship game resulted in additional publicity for the university worth about $1.2 billion. In an example of the "Flutie effect", applications rose by 41% after the 2010 appearance.

In June 2011, USA Today ranked Butler as one of the top 5 colleges making use of social media. Specific to basketball, Butler's current and future mascots, the men's basketball program, head coach Brad Stevens, and other coaches have university-endorsed Twitter accounts. Also, an online community, BU Hoops, exists to facilitate discussion among fans.

In recent years, the Butler program has also received national attention for its philosophy to the game, which it calls "The Butler Way". At its core, The Butler Way calls for complete commitment and exalts teamwork above self.


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Ronald Nored on the Butler Way and What Has Changed




Synopsis

The Butler Way opens with a discussion of the Butler Way. Barry Collier, a former Butler player, was hired as coach in 1989 and slowly rebuilt a program that has declined since the days of Tony Hinkle. Collier emphasized the Butler way which featured team play. Fans will also be pleased to read about the famed Hinkle Fieldhouse, the greatest coaches, teams, players, and great moments in the storied history of Butler basketball.



Teamwork: It's the Butler way


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Praises for:
  'The Butler Way: The Best of Butler Basketball
by David Woods with Foreword by Clark Kellogg'


"... If you want to learn how basketball is played in its purest form "the team game" learn all you can about Butler hoops. They represent what college basketball is all about. This book is awesome, baby !..."
Dick Vitale

"... Smart, tough, and unselfish. Disciplined, confident, and poised. Competitive, freely, and with great joy. Those characteristics have been on display through multiple classes of players and a number of head coaches, which speaks to the essence of Butler's sustained success. There are many ways to achieve championship-level success in D-1 college basketball, and Butler has found its own way - The Butler Way. ..."
From the Foreword by Clark Kellogg

"... After reading this book, I feel like I experienced the campus excitement all firsthand. I greatly appreciate David Woods efforts to put that atmosphere into words. ..."
Brad Stevens, Butler University Men's Basketball Coach

"... An original book both gentle and bold... containing many passages worth perusing. ..."
Indianapolis Business Journal

"... You will relive the glory of the Butler Bulldogs basketball program and all the great teams from the 1920s through today. You will get to know the greatest players and coaches both past and present. David Woods captures the essence of this remarkable basketball program and gives you a front row seat to one of America's most storied college basketball programs. ..."
Books Reviews



Butler University Basketball




About the Author: David Woods

The Butler Way: The Best of Butler Basketball by David Woods with Foreword by Clark Kellogg
David Woods has covered Butler basketball for over eight seasons for the Indianapolis Star.

David Woods is an Urbana, Illinois native who has won national and state awards for his sports reporting. Woods, a University of Illinois graduate, has covered five Olympic games for The Indianapolis Star, and he has been that paper’s beat writer for Butler basketball since 2001.

He also hosts the newspaper's “Bulldog Insider” blog for IndyStar.com and is also      the author of Underdawgs: How Brad Stevens and Butler University Built the Bulldogs for March Madness
He and his wife, Jan, and their two daughters live in Indianapolis.



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• Format:  eBook & Book
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• Publisher: Cardinal Publisher's Group ~ First edition
• Publishing Date: NEW ON April 11, 2012
• eBook Edition: NEW ON April 11, 2012
• Book Edition Binding: Paperback
• Book Edition Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
• Language: English

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« Reply #5 on: Mar 16, 2012, 01:54:42 AM »

Basketball Bibliography: Our Unique Game of Basketball History, Biographies and Facts


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Don't Put Me In, Coach:
My Incredible NCAA Journey
from the End of the Bench
to the End of the Bench
by Mark Titus


At Ohio State, Titus played basketball alongside seven future NBA picks and holds the record for career wins.
During that time, as you'd know from reading his three million-plus-hit blog Club Trillion, he scored a total of nine points.
A paean to the average guy, and Titus has already had media exposure, so expect demand.
The application of the blog's crude-yet-clever shtick to a book-length chronicle of Titus' four years at OSU wears thin in later chapters, but the unique combination of snort-inducing hilarity and insider perspective makes this required reading for younger (or just perpetually immature) hoop heads. A perfect way to pass the time during the tournament's endless TV timeouts.



Don't Put Me In, Coach


Excerpt by Mark Titus

Anybody who has ever been a walk-on for a Division I football or basketball team will tell you that being likened to Rudy at least once during a four-year career is pretty much an inevitability. The general public hears the term "walk-on" and immediately thinks that anyone who couldn't earn a scholarship must have been told his entire life that he wasn't good enough, before he relentlessly annoyed coaches for a spot on the team and got life-changing advice from what has to be the wisest field maintenance guy to ever live.

Sadly, this image of a short, white walk-on caring more about the success of the team than all of his teammates combined is reinforced every March, when the guys wearing all their warm-ups on the end of the bench react to routine plays in the NCAA Tournament like tween girls at a Bieber concert. These douchers ruin it for the rest of us, as they cement a stereotype for all walk-ons that forever perpetuates the Rudy comparison.

Well, you're never going to believe this, but not all walk-ons actually fit this description. I know, I know. It's hard to wrap your mind around the fact that there are sometimes exceptions to stereotypes, but you're just going to have to trust me with this one.

I was fully aware of the walk-on stereotype when I started my career at Ohio State, which is why I promised myself that I would do everything in my power to be an exception. Don't get me wrong, I think Rudy is full of all sorts of inspiration and is the second-best sports movie ever made. (I'm from Indiana and played basketball — I'll let you guess what I think the best sports movie of all time is.)

But I've found that very few people make a Rudy comparison in a complimentary way. Instead, they seem to be saying, "I think it's adorable how you try really hard even though you suck balls and there's no way you'll ever get a chance to play." This is why, from day one, I tried to distance myself from the Rudy comparison by pulling pranks on superstar teammates, routinely falling asleep during film sessions, and basically spending every day with the team trying to figure out exactly how much I could get away with. And as it turned out, I could get away with a lot. ......


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...... Whenever I reminisce with my friends and family about my four years of being a dickhead at Ohio State, they always seem to ask how exactly I was capable of getting away with some of the things I did. (Don't worry, we'll cover all of my shenanigans later.) After all, I was the bottom-feeder on the team who was supposed to just keep his mouth shut and stand on the sideline during practice until a coach told me to step in for a drill and essentially get sodomized in my role as human punching bag. You'd think that it would only take one screwup on my part for Coach Matta to send my ass packing, but instead he seemed to embrace me as the comedic relief for the team.

In the history of the walk-on–head coach relationship, this was unprecedented. Never had someone in my position been given the freedom I was given, which is why I felt a great responsibility to use this privilege to my advantage. Which brings us back to the original question: how did I go from being a math major basketball manager who knew only three people on campus to one of the loudest voices in the locker room of the number-one-ranked college basketball team in less than a month? The answer to that lies deeply buried in a story about drugs, prostitution, love, betrayal, organized crime in the 1920s, and one man's pursuit of the American Dream.

And by that I mean that the answer has nothing to do with any of those things. Sorry if I got your hopes up.
Mark Titus



Synopsis

An irreverent, hilarious insider's look at big-time NCAA basketball, through the eyes of the nation's most famous benchwarmer and author of the popular blog ClubTrillion.com (3.6m visits!). Mark Titus holds the Ohio State record for career wins, and made it to the 2007 national championship game. You would think Titus would be all over the highlight reels. You'd be wrong.

  In 2006, Mark Titus arrived on Ohio State's campus as a former high school basketball player who aspired to be an orthopedic surgeon. Somehow, he was added to the elite Buckeye basketball team, given a scholarship, and played alongside seven future NBA players on his way to setting the record for most individual career wins in Ohio State history. Think that's impressive? In four years, he scored a grand total of nine—yes, nine—points.

This book will give readers an uncensored and uproarious look inside an elite NCAA basketball program from Titus's unique perspective. In his four years at the end of the bench, Mark founded his wildly popular blog Club Trillion, became a hero to all guys picked last, and even got scouted by the Harlem Globetrotters. Mark Titus is not your average basketball star. This is a wild and completely true story of the most unlikely career in college basketball. A must-read for all fans of March Madness and college sports!


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Praises for:
'Don't Put Me In, Coach: My Incredible NCAA Journey from the End of the Bench to the End of the Bench' by Mark Titus

"... Mark Titus knows a lot of personal secrets of mine. If he revealed any of them in this book, I will kick him right in the testicles. I’m not joking. ..."
Greg Oden (#1 overall pick in 2007 NBA Draft, 2007 1st Team All-American)

"... Of all the players I’ve coached in my career, Mark Titus is one of them. ....”
Thad Matta (head basketball coach at Ohio State)

“... You want me to give you a quote?  I guess I shouldn’t be surprised.  You’ve been riding my coattails for years, so of course you want to put my name on your book to sell more copies. ...”
Evan Turner (#2 overall pick in 2010 NBA Draft, 2010 college basketball National Player of The Year)

“... I haven’t read this book and probably never will, but the cover looks pretty cool I guess. ...”
Mike Conley Jr. (#4 overall pick in 2007 NBA Draft, 2007 NCAA Tournament South Regional MVP)

  "... If Mark Titus had been able to play basketball the way he can write, he would have joined his Ohio State team mates in the NBA. No kidding. This is nothing less than a modern-day basketball version of Ball Four, a terrific look behind the locker room door, funny and profane and real. Great stuff. ..."
Leigh Montville, New York Times bestselling author of Ted Williams: The Biography of an American Hero and Evel: The High-Flying Life of Evel Knievel: American Showman, Daredevil, and Legend

"... A walk-on leverages fortuitous friendships and a quick wit to enjoy the ride of a lifetime. Overly enthusiastic, towel-waving benchwarmers are a staple of March Madness; they are not, however, media magnets. Grantland.com's Titus, a walk-on at Ohio State University from 2006 to 2010, proved an exception when his "Club Trillion" blog--so named for the box-score line a seldom-used player logs when he plays but accumulates no countable statistics--became a national sensation.

A solid high-school player who could have garnered scholarship offers from smaller schools, the author decided instead to follow some of his megastar AAU teammates--including future NBA players Greg Oden, Mike Conley and Daequan Cook--to OSU for the chance to experience college life at a major university.

A gig as a student manager led to a role as a walk-on player when the coaching staff needed an injury replacement. Emboldened by his friendship with Oden, OSU's marquee player, he became the team's resident prankster, initially content to confine his hijinks to the locker room--until his junior year, when he began blogging about his antics, drawing attention from a local newspaper and, later, the notice of ESPN's Bill Simmons, Titus' idol and one of the most popular sportswriters in the country.

An appearance on Simmons' podcast led to an explosion in Club Trillion's popularity, making him nearly as well known as teammate and national player of the year Evan "The Villain" Turner (so dubbed by Titus after several confrontations between the two). The application of the blog's crude-yet-clever shtick to a book-length chronicle of Titus' four years at OSU wears thin in later chapters, but the unique combination of snort-inducing hilarity and insider perspective makes this required reading for younger (or just perpetually immature) hoop heads. A perfect way to pass the time during the tournament's endless TV timeouts. ..."
Kirkus

"... The Maxim demographic will revel in Titus’s rebellious tales, which come with a heaping portion of snarky, bro-friendly prose, scatological humor, and pop culture references…. And under all the pranks and immaturity, Titus is a likable, forthright narrator. ...”
Publishers Weekly


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Doug Miles radio interview with Mark Titus author "Don't Put Me In Coach"  about his college basketball career riding the bench at Ohio State University.



This book explained by Mark Titus...

Mark Titus spent his college basketball career collecting splinters in his red shorts on the bench. He was a walk-on who won a spot on the roster of Ohio State University's vaunted Big Ten basketball team from 2006 to 2010. He set the record for most individual career wins in school history — while scoring just nine points in his four years.

Titus founded a blog to write about his experience on the team. He called it Club Trillion, because that's what all the numbers following your name look like when you play one minute per game but get no points or assists, or much else besides another cup of Gatorade.

But Titus' wit and spirit quickly won him his own fan base. He has continued to write funny, original and often profane sports pieces, most recently for ESPN's website Grantland, and he has just released an irreverent new memoir that gives an insider's look at NCAA basketball. It's called Don't Put Me In, Coach: My Incredible Journey from the End of the Bench to the End of the Bench.

Titus tells NPR's Scott Simon that landing on the Ohio State team was almost a fluke. He was an "above average" basketball player in high school, he says, and played on the same youth team as future NBA stars Greg Oden and Mike Conley. Harvard University initially recruited him, but the offer fell through after a couple of Harvard coaches came to one of his high school games.

Titus and his coach had gotten into "a little bit of a fight, and I was suspended for the first half of the game," he admits. "It was my understanding that they were more or less coming to just support me, rather than recruit. ... I came back out in the second half and they were gone, and I never heard from them again."

Laughing, he adds, "It's not really smart to put all your eggs in a Harvard basket, and that's kind of what I did."

So instead, he followed his good friend and teammate Greg Oden, who was the No. 1 recruit in the country at the time, to Ohio State. Thinking that high school was his athletic ceiling, he didn't intend to play basketball at Ohio. But he tried out as a walk-on and made the team. He held his spot for four years — not so much because he was so good but because the really good players kept getting drafted by the pros.

Nevertheless, Titus shared fully in the team's emotional highs and lows. In his freshman year, the Ohio State team made the Final Four and lost narrowly to Florida in the national championship game. Titus says that loss was particularly disappointing because he knew it was the last contest he would be in with his longtime friends and teammates Oden and Conley.

"I kind of knew that that was my last game I'd ever play with them, unless I somehow miraculously made it to the NBA and we all got on the same team," Titus says. "So for me, it was unfortunate that our time together had to end on a sour note."

Titus thinks that the passion of the players is what makes college basketball so appealing. "With college, especially end of term, when you get the seniors, and they know — especially at the smaller schools — they know that this is their last chance to play basketball, and so they, like, pull off the miracle upset against the team full of NBA guys. You know, that happens seemingly every year."

Although he hardly ever played, even Titus was lucky enough to experience a senior's passion in his last game at OSU. He was scheduled to have surgery the next day, so while some of his teammates would go on to play in the NCAA tournament, it was the last time he would ever wear an Ohio State jersey. A lot of fans knew this because he had written about it on his blog.

"So, I come out and there are, like, 3,000 students wearing T-shirts with my blog's logo on them," Titus recalls. "They introduced me, and I was just kind of overcome with emotion. I started crying, and it's still pretty embarrassing to talk about now, and I still get a lot of flak about it from my teammates. And we won big enough to where I got to get in, and I was out on the court as the horn sounded and we won the Big Ten."

So, despite the facetious title of his book and his insistence that he never wanted to be a "Rudy," Titus' college basketball career did end up following the traditional "walk on makes good" storyline, at least in this small way.

"I mean, I don't think I could've scripted it any better, how it ended up working out for me," he says.
NPR STAFF





About the Author: Mark Titus


Mark Titus (born June 25, 1987) is an American blogger, college graduate and former walk-on basketball player for Ohio State University. Since October 2008, he has written about his basketball-related experiences in his blog 'Club Trillion'. He was selected in the 2010 Harlem Globetrotters draft.

He has worked as a contributing writer for ESPN Insider on men's college basketball and in 2011 began contributing material for ESPN's new site, Grantland.com.

Mark Titus's blog, http://clubtrillion.blogspot.com, has recorded over 3.6 million views since its debut in late 2008.  He has been featured in the New York Times, ESPN.com, Yahoo.com, the Associated Press, and the Cleveland Plain Dealer. He has recently attempted to enter the NBA draft and tried out for the Harlem Globetrotters. Titus graduated from Ohio State in 2010, a hero to millions.

Born in Brownsburg, Indiana,  Titus played basketball at Brownsburg High School in Indiana.  For Brownsburg High, Titus scored more than 1,000 career points (only other 1000 point scorers in BHS history: Eric Riggs '94, Jered Reeves '02, and Gordon Hayward '08) and was voted second team All-Indiana selection twice.  He played on the same AAU team as future NBA players Daequan Cook, Eric Gordon, Josh McRoberts, Mike Conley, and Greg Oden.

In the fall of 2006, Titus enrolled at Ohio State University, where he planned on attending medical school and being a student manager for the basketball team.  He was quickly added to the roster by coach Thad Matta as a walk-on, and was cleared to play for the Buckeyes on November 10. In the Buckeyes' season opener, Titus received three minutes of playing time and made each of his two free throw attempts.  Titus played in 14 of the team's 39 games.

During the 2008–2009 basketball season, Titus created his own blog, "Club Trillion", with the name referring to his line in the box score for many games: '1' in the first column (minutes played), followed by zeroes in the other nine columns (points, rebounds, etc). Titus' blog, and his antics as a player, gained him some attention in the sports media. Titus had many of his followers join him in growing mustaches and pictures were posted on his blog.

He appeared on ESPN.com's 'BS Report' with Bill Simmons on March 11, 2009, and again on March 24, 2010. On April 9, 2009, Titus, although a walk-on with no hopes of playing in the NBA, used his blog to formally announce his entrance into the 2009 NBA Draft. The blog entry eventually became a headline story on Yahoo!’s home page.

During his senior season, Titus received cheers from opposing fans, and received coverage from opposing school newspapers. Titus was mentioned in the New York Times and the Associated Press. Titus has also made comedic jabs at teammate Evan Turner. Titus' "Mr. Rainmaker" video on YouTube has received over 400,000 views. In July 2010, Titus famously scored 110 goals in one game of FIFA 10. It is believed to be one of the highest-scoring games in the franchise's history.


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• Author: Mark Titus
• Format:  eBook & Book
• Book Edition Number of Pages: 272 ~ 6.4 x 1.1 x 9.5 inches
• File Size:  1971 KB
• Browse Duration in Minutes: 90
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• Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
• Lending: Enabled
• Text-to-Speech: Enabled
• Publisher: Doubleday ~ First edition
• Publishing Date: NEW ON March 6, 2012
• eBook Edition: NEW ON March 6, 2012
• Book Edition Binding: Hardcover
• Book Edition Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
• Language: English

• Also available: In the classic hardcover edition


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